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Realization of Masticatory Movement by 3-Dimensional Simulation of the Temporomandibular Joint and the Masticatory Muscles

Authors
 Jong-Tae Park  ;  Sung-Yoon Won  ;  Sang-Hee Lee  ;  Jung-Yul Cha  ;  Hee-Jin Kim 
Citation
 Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, Vol.24(4) : 347-351, 2013 
Journal Title
 Journal of Craniofacial Surgery 
ISSN
 1049-2275 
Issue Date
2013
MeSH
Adult ; Humans ; Imaging, Three-Dimensional ; Male ; Mastication/physiology* ; Masticatory Muscles/diagnostic imaging ; Masticatory Muscles/physiology* ; Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted ; Skull/diagnostic imaging ; Temporomandibular Joint/diagnostic imaging ; Temporomandibular Joint/physiology* ; Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods*
Keywords
Adult ; Humans ; Imaging, Three-Dimensional ; Male ; Mastication/physiology* ; Masticatory Muscles/diagnostic imaging ; Masticatory Muscles/physiology* ; Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted ; Skull/diagnostic imaging ; Temporomandibular Joint/diagnostic imaging ; Temporomandibular Joint/physiology* ; Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods*
Abstract
Masticatory muscles are closely involved in mastication, pronunciation, and swallowing, and it is therefore important to study the specific functions and dynamics of the mandibular and masticatory muscles. However, the shortness of muscle fibers and the diversity of movement directions make it difficult to study and simplify the dynamics of mastication. The purpose of this study was to use 3-dimensional (3D) simulation to observe the functions and movements of each of the masticatory muscles and the mandible while chewing. To simulate the masticatory movement, computed tomographic images were taken from a single Korean volunteer (30-year-old man), and skull image data were reconstructed in 3D (Mimics; Materialise, Leuven, Belgium). The 3D-reconstructed masticatory muscles were then attached to the 3D skull model. The masticatory movements were animated using Maya (Autodesk, San Rafael, CA) based on the mandibular motion path. During unilateral chewing, the mandible was found to move laterally toward the functional side by contracting the contralateral lateral pterygoid and ipsilateral temporalis muscles. During the initial mouth opening, only hinge movement was observed at the temporomandibular joint. During this period, the entire mandible rotated approximately 13 degrees toward the bicondylar horizontal plane. Continued movement of the mandible to full mouth opening occurred simultaneously with sliding and hinge movements, and the mandible rotated approximately 17 degrees toward the center of the mandibular ramus. The described approach can yield data for use in face animation and other simulation systems and for elucidating the functional components related to contraction and relaxation of muscles during mastication.
Full Text
http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&CSC=Y&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&AN=00001665-201307000-00136&LSLINK=80&D=ovft
DOI
10.1097/SCS.0b013e31828f2d73
Appears in Collections:
5. Research Institutes (연구소) > Human Identification Research Center (개인식별연구소) > 1. Journal Papers
2. College of Dentistry (치과대학) > Dept. of Oral Biology (구강생물학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
2. College of Dentistry (치과대학) > Dept. of Orthodontics (교정과학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Kim, Hee Jin(김희진) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1139-6261
Park, Jong Tae(박종태)
Won, Sung Yoon(원성윤)
Lee, Sang Hee(이상희)
Lee, Jae Gi(이재기)
Cha, Jung Yul(차정열)
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/88890
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