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Sex differences in the relationship between socioeconomic status and metabolic syndrome: the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Authors
 So-Jung Park  ;  Hee-Taik Kang  ;  Chung-Mo Nam  ;  Byoung-Jin Park  ;  John A. Linton  ;  Yong-Jae Lee 
Citation
 DIABETES RESEARCH AND CLINICAL PRACTICE, Vol.96(3) : 400-406, 2012 
Journal Title
 DIABETES RESEARCH AND CLINICAL PRACTICE 
ISSN
 0168-8227 
Issue Date
2012
MeSH
Adult ; Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology ; Asian Continental Ancestry Group/statistics & numerical data* ; Blood Glucose/metabolism* ; Body Mass Index ; Female ; Humans ; Lipoproteins, HDL/blood* ; Logistic Models ; Male ; Metabolic Syndrome/blood ; Metabolic Syndrome/economics ; Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology* ; Multivariate Analysis ; Nutrition Surveys* ; Prevalence ; Republic of Korea/epidemiology ; Sex Characteristics ; Smoking/epidemiology ; Social Class ; Triglycerides/blood* ; Waist Circumference
Keywords
Socioeconomic status ; Metabolic syndrome ; Sex differences ; Cross-sectional study
Abstract
AIMS: To investigate sex differences in the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in Korean adults. METHODS: We examined the relationship between SES, as measured by household income or education level, and the prevalence of MetS in Korean adults who participated in the 2007-2008 Korean National Health Examination and Nutrition Survey (KNHANES). The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for MetS were calculated using multivariate logistic regression analysis across household income and education level quartiles. RESULTS: We found significant differences between men and women in the association between SES and MetS, with a positive association for men and an inverse association for women. The adjusted OR and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) for MetS for the highest vs. lowest quartile of household income was 1.59 (1.15-2.20) in men. The adjusted ORs for MetS for the highest vs. lowest quartile of household income and education level were 0.54 (0.41-0.72) and 0.26 (0.17-0.38) in women, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We found sex differences in the relationship between SES and the prevalence of MetS in Korea. These findings suggest that sex-specific public health interventions that consider SES are needed for the prevention and treatment of MetS.
Full Text
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168822711007078
DOI
22245695
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Preventive Medicine and Public Health (예방의학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Family Medicine (가정의학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Kang, Hee Taik(강희택)
Nam, Chung Mo(남정모) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0985-0928
Park, Byoung Jin(박병진) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1733-5301
Lee, Yong Jae(이용제) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6697-476X
Linton, John A.(인요한) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8000-3049
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/90119
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