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Quantitative anatomical analysis of facial expression using a 3D motion capture system: Application to cosmetic surgery and facial recognition technology.

Authors
 JAE-GI LEE  ;  SU-JIN JUNG  ;  HYUNG-JIN LEE  ;  JUNG-HYUK SEO  ;  YOU-JIN CHOI  ;  HYUN-SOOK BAE  ;  JONG-TAE PARK  ;  HEE-JIN KIM 
Citation
 Clinical Anatomy, Vol.28(6) : 735-744, 2015 
Journal Title
 Clinical Anatomy 
ISSN
 0897-3806 
Issue Date
2015
MeSH
Adult ; Equipment Design ; Facial Expression* ; Facial Muscles/anatomy & histology* ; Facial Recognition* ; Female ; Healthy Volunteers ; Humans ; Imaging, Three-Dimensional/instrumentation* ; Male ; Rhytidoplasty* ; Surgery, Computer-Assisted/methods* ; Surgery, Plastic/methods*
Keywords
3D motion capture ; facial expression ; facial movement ; quantitative analysis ; anatomical landmarks
Abstract
The topography of the facial muscles differs between males and females and among individuals of the same gender. To explain the unique expressions that people can make, it is important to define the shapes of the muscle, their associations with the skin, and their relative functions. Three-dimensional (3D) motion-capture analysis, often used to study facial expression, was used in this study to identify characteristic skin movements in males and females when they made six representative basic expressions. The movements of 44 reflective markers (RMs) positioned on anatomical landmarks were measured. Their mean displacement was large in males [ranging from 14.31 mm (fear) to 41.15 mm (anger)], and 3.35-4.76 mm smaller in females [ranging from 9.55 mm (fear) to 37.80 mm (anger)]. The percentages of RMs involved in the ten highest mean maximum displacement values in making at least one expression were 47.6% in males and 61.9% in females. The movements of the RMs were larger in males than females but were more limited. Expanding our understanding of facial expression requires morphological studies of facial muscles and studies of related complex functionality. Conducting these together with quantitative analyses, as in the present study, will yield data valuable for medicine, dentistry, and engineering, for example, for surgical operations on facial regions, software for predicting changes in facial features and expressions after corrective surgery, and the development of face-mimicking robots.
Full Text
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ca.22542/abstract
DOI
10.1002/ca.22542
Appears in Collections:
1. Journal Papers (연구논문) > 2. College of Dentistry (치과대학) > Dept. of Oral Biology (구강생물학교실)
Yonsei Authors
김희진(Kim, Hee Jin) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1139-6261
이형진(Lee, Hyung Jin) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3082-935X
최유진(Choi, You Jin) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3701-2200
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URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/157247
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