0 148

Cited 73 times in

The Resting Brain of Alcoholics.

Authors
 Eva M. Müller-Oehring  ;  Young-Chul Jung  ;  Adolf Pfefferbaum  ;  Edith V. Sullivan  ;  Tilman Schulte 
Citation
 CEREBRAL CORTEX, Vol.25(11) : 4155-4168, 2015 
Journal Title
 CEREBRAL CORTEX 
ISSN
 1047-3211 
Issue Date
2015
MeSH
Alcoholism/pathology* ; Brain/blood supply ; Brain/physiopathology* ; Brain Mapping* ; Case-Control Studies ; Female ; Humans ; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Male ; Neural Pathways/blood supply ; Neural Pathways/physiopathology* ; Oxygen/blood ; Rest* ; Statistics, Nonparametric
Keywords
alcoholism ; cerebral networks ; cognition and emotion ; fMRI ; resting-state functional connectivity
Abstract
Chronic alcohol consumption affects multiple cognitive processes supported by far-reaching cerebral networks. To identify neurofunctional mechanisms underlying selective deficits, 27 sober alcoholics and 26 age-matched controls underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and neuropsychological testing. Functional connectivity analysis assessed the default mode network (DMN); integrative executive control (EC), salience (SA), and attention (AT) networks; primary somatosensory, auditory, and visual (VI) input networks; and subcortical reward (RW) and emotion (EM) networks. The groups showed an extensive overlap of intrinsic connectivity in all brain networks examined, suggesting overall integrity of large-scale functional networks. Despite these similar patterns, connectivity analyses identified network-specific differences of weaker within-network connectivity and expanded connectivity to regions outside the main networks in alcoholics compared with controls. For AT and VI networks, better task performance was related to expanded connectivity in alcoholism, supporting the concept of network expansion as a neural mechanism for functional compensation. For default mode, SA, RW, and EC networks, both weaker within-network and expanded outside-network connectivity correlated with poorer performance and mood. Current smoking contributed to some of these abnormalities in connectivity. The observed pattern of resting-state connectivity might reflect neural vulnerability of intrinsic networking in alcoholics and suggests a mechanism to explain signature impairments in EM, RW evaluation, and EC ability.
DOI
10.1093/cercor/bhu134
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Psychiatry (정신과학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Jung, Young Chul(정영철) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0578-2510
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/157240
사서에게 알리기
  feedback

qrcode

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse

Links