0 355

Cited 127 times in

Cephalometric and physiologic predictors of the efficacy of an adjustable oral appliance for treating obstructive sleep apnea

Authors
 Yuehua Liu  ;  Alan A. Lowe  ;  Dip Orthodont  ;  John A. Fleetham  ;  Young-Chel Park 
Citation
 AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ORTHODONTICS AND DENTOFACIAL ORTHOPEDICS, Vol.120(6) : 639-647, 2001 
Journal Title
 AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ORTHODONTICS AND DENTOFACIAL ORTHOPEDICS 
ISSN
 0889-5406 
Issue Date
2001
MeSH
Adult ; Age Factors ; Aged ; Aged, 80 and over ; Analysis of Variance ; Body Mass Index ; Cephalometry ; Female ; Humans ; Linear Models ; Male ; Mandibular Advancement/instrumentation* ; Middle Aged ; Occlusal Splints* ; Polysomnography ; Prognosis ; Regression Analysis ; Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/pathology ; Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/therapy* ; Statistics, Nonparametric
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate whether any physiologic or cephalometric parameters could be used to predict the efficacy of an adjustable mandibular advancement appliance for treating obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Forty-two male and 5 female patients with OSA were recruited on the basis of baseline polysomnography with a documented Apnea and Hypopnea Index (AHI) greater than 15 per hour. Repeat polysomnography was performed with the appliance in place. Baseline cephalometry was performed for each patient, and follow-up cephalometry was completed for 19 of the subjects. The subjects were divided into 3 groups on the basis of the degree of change in the AHI with oral appliance therapy: good response (> 75% decrease in AHI), moderate response (25% to 75% decrease in AHI), and poor response (< 25% decrease in AHI). Patients with a good response were younger and had smaller upper airways. In a linear regression analysis, the change in AHI (%) was associated with physiologic (age and body mass index), cephalometric (overjet, height of the maxillary molars, vertical height of the hyoid bone), and airway variables. However, changes in either overbite or overjet were not related to changes in any of the polysomnographic variables for the 19 subjects. A stepwise regression analysis revealed a better treatment response with the adjustable mandibular advancement appliance in patients who were younger and had a lower body mass index, a longer maxilla, a smaller oropharynx, a smaller overjet, less erupted maxillary molars, and a larger ratio of vertical airway length to the cross-sectional area of the soft palate.
Full Text
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0889540601893641
Appears in Collections:
2. College of Dentistry (치과대학) > Dept. of Orthodontics (교정과학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Park, Young Chel(박영철)
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/142873
사서에게 알리기
  feedback

qrcode

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse

Links