3 253

Cited 4 times in

Building the mammalian cochlea — an overview

Authors
 Jinwoong Bok 
Citation
 GENES & GENOMICS, Vol.32(1) : 1-7, 2010 
Journal Title
 GENES & GENOMICS 
ISSN
 1976-9571 
Issue Date
2010
Keywords
Cochlea ; Inner ear ; Hair cell ; Mammals ; Organogenesis ; Hearing loss
Abstract
The mammalian cochlea is a highly intricate organ responsible for hearing. Numerous specialized cell types residing in the cochlear participate in processing and relaying sound information to the brain. In general, cells in the cochlea are divided into three major types: sensory, neural, and non-sensory. Sensory cells are a group of cells in the organ of Corti consisting of hair cells and supporting cells. Sensory hair cells play a primary role in detecting and processing sound in the form of vibrations. Neural cells are the neurons and glia in the spiral (cochlear) ganglion that relay the processed sound signals in the form of a neurotransmitter to the brain. Other non-sensory cells include all other cell types providing architectural and functional support. Building a functional cochlea requires tightly orchestrated, spatial and temporal regulation of gene expressions. Disruption of the normal gene expression patterns can cause developmental failure of the organ, which can lead to permanent hearing loss. Thus, comprehensive understanding of genes contributing to cochlear development is crucial for elucidating the pathological mechanisms of hearing loss. This article is intended to provide an overview of mammalian cochlear development, focusing on genes involved in its early patterning.
Full Text
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13258-010-0001-1
DOI
10.1007/s13258-010-0001-1
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Anatomy (해부학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Bok, Jin Woong(복진웅) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1958-1872
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/100633
사서에게 알리기
  feedback

qrcode

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse