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Impact of the gap between socioeconomic stratum and subjective social class on depressive symptoms: Unique insights from a longitudinal analysis

Authors
 Jae-Hyun Kim  ;  Sang Gyu Lee  ;  Jaeyong Shin  ;  Eun-Cheol Park 
Citation
 Social Science & Medicine, Vol.120 : 49-56, 2014 
Journal Title
 Social Science & Medicine 
ISSN
 0277-9536 
Issue Date
2014
MeSH
Adult ; Aged ; Depression/economics ; Depression/epidemiology* ; Educational Status ; Female ; Health Behavior ; Humans ; Income ; Longitudinal Studies ; Male ; Middle Aged ; Republic of Korea/epidemiology ; Social Class* ; Surveys and Questionnaires
Keywords
Depressive symptoms ; Social class ; Socioeconomic stratum
Abstract
Our objective was to investigate whether gaps between socioeconomic stratum and subjective social class affect the prevalence of depressive symptoms. We collected data from the Korean Health Panel Survey, years 2009 and 2011, and performed a longitudinal analysis of 12,357 individuals at baseline (2009), estimating the prevalence of depressive symptoms among individuals with disparate socioeconomic stratum (High, Middle, or Low household income and education level, respectively) and subjective social class (High, Middle, or Low). The odds ratio for depressive symptoms among individuals with High household income and High social class, or Low household income and Low social class, was 0.537 and 1.877, respectively (p < 0.0001), and that among individuals with High education level and High social class, or Low education and Low social class, was 0.700 and 1.597, respectively (p: 0.001, p < 0.0001, respectively). The likelihood of having depressive symptoms increased within each level of income and education, as the subjective social class decreased from High to Low. The adjusted effect of the gap between socioeconomic stratum and subjective social class on depressive symptoms deteriorated, as a whole, across the socioeconomic spectrum. The gap between socioeconomic stratum and perceived position in the social hierarchy explains a substantial part of inequalities in the prevalence of depressive symptoms. It is important to consider the impact of discrepancies between different measures of socioeconomic well-being on depressive symptoms rather than looking at the subjective social class alone.
Files in This Item:
T201402888.pdf Download
DOI
10.1016/j.socscimed.2014.09.001
Appears in Collections:
4. Graduate School of Public Health (보건대학원) > Graduate School of Public Health (보건대학원) > 1. Journal Papers
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Preventive Medicine and Public Health (예방의학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Park, Eun-Cheol(박은철) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2306-5398
Shin, Jae Yong(신재용)
Lee, Sang Gyu(이상규) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4847-2421
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/99628
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