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Intestinal parasitic infections among children aged 12-59 months in Nyamasheke District, Rwanda

Authors
 Evariste Hakizimana  ;  Ju Yeong Kim  ;  Singeun Oh  ;  Moonsoo Yoon  ;  Tai-Soon Yong 
Citation
 PARASITES HOSTS AND DISEASES, Vol.61(3) : 304-309, 2023-08 
Journal Title
PARASITES HOSTS AND DISEASES
ISSN
 2982-5164 
Issue Date
2023-08
MeSH
Agriculture ; Animals ; Ascaris lumbricoides ; Child ; Cross-Sectional Studies ; Humans ; Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic* / epidemiology ; Rwanda / epidemiology
Keywords
Intestinal parasite ; hygiene practice ; risk factor ; sanitation
Abstract
Intestinal parasitic infections are a public health burden and a major cause of illness in developing countries. The diseases lead to various health threats, including growth retardation and mental health-related disorders, especially in children. We assessed the risk factors for intestinal parasitic infections among children aged 12-59 months residing in Nyamasheke District, Rwanda. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted using secondary data from 1,048 children aged 12-59 months whose stool samples were examined for the presence of intestinal parasites and whose results were registered in the laboratory information system in 2020. The prevalence of intestinal parasites in children aged 12-59 months was 53.2%. The dominant parasites were Ascaris lumbricoides (13.1%), followed by Giardia lamblia (10.9%), Entamoeba histolytica (7.9%), Trichuris trichiura (6.5%), hookworms (1.7%), and Taenia species (1.4%). A significant association was observed between intestinal parasites and the literacy of mothers or children's caregivers (odds ratio (OR)=5.09, P<0.001). Children from farming households were 2.8-fold more likely to contract intestinal parasitic infections than those from nonfarming households (OR=2.8, P<0.001). A significant association was also observed between intestinal parasites and food safety (OR=4.9, P<0.001). Intestinal parasitic infections were significantly associated with hand hygiene practices after using the toilet and washing fresh fruits before eating (P<0.001). The information gathered will help public health providers and partners develop control plans in highly endemic areas in Rwanda.
Files in This Item:
T202307138.pdf Download
DOI
10.3347/PHD.23045
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Others (기타) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Kim, Ju Yeong(김주영) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2456-6298
Yong, Tai Soon(용태순) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3445-0769
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/197576
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