0 50

Cited 0 times in

Facile fabrication of elastic, macro-porous, and fast vascularized silicone orbital implant

Authors
 Peifang Xu  ;  Jing Cao  ;  Xue Feng  ;  Qi Gao  ;  Sang Yeul Lee  ;  Juan Ye 
Citation
 JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL MATERIALS RESEARCH PART B-APPLIED BIOMATERIALS, Vol.109(5) : 765-774, 2021-05 
Journal Title
JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL MATERIALS RESEARCH PART B-APPLIED BIOMATERIALS
ISSN
 1552-4973 
Issue Date
2021-05
MeSH
Animals ; Biocompatible Materials ; Cytoskeleton / metabolism ; Elasticity ; Endothelial Cells / cytology ; Gelatin / chemistry ; Humans ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Mice ; NIH 3T3 Cells ; Orbital Implants* ; Polyethylenes ; Porosity ; Prosthesis Design ; Rabbits ; Silicones / chemistry* ; Stress, Mechanical ; Tissue Engineering / methods ; Tissue Scaffolds
Keywords
fibro-vascularization ; mechanical properties ; orbital implant ; porous silicone scaffold
Abstract
Orbital implants with interconnected porous architecture had gained prominence, as they were capable of being colonized by fibrovascular tissue and minimizing complications. However, mechanical properties of orbital implant had received little attention among existing design philosophy. Herein, a compliant porous silicone scaffold was developed by gelatin porogen-leaching method and used as the orbital implant in this study. The silicone scaffolds exhibited desired microstructure and simulated mechanical properties, including high porosity of ~90%, suitable pore size of 280-450 μm, reduced modulus of 50.1 ± 11.7 KPa, and excellent elasticity. in vitro results showed that the porous silicone scaffolds did not exhibit noticeable cytotoxicity and were favorable for both adhesion and proliferation of human vascular ECs. The porous silicone scaffold was easy to be manipulated when implanted into the anophthalmic sockets of rabbits. The implanted scaffolds provided satisfactory volume replacement and induced extensive fibro-vascularization, showing desirable orbital reconstruction effects. Therefore, our novel porous silicone scaffolds may be promising substitutes for current orbital implants.
Full Text
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jbm.b.34742
DOI
10.1002/jbm.b.34742
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Ophthalmology (안과학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Lee, Sang Yeul(이상열)
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/190925
사서에게 알리기
  feedback

qrcode

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse

Links