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Brain Connectivity Affecting Gait Function After Unilateral Supratentorial Stroke

Authors
 Hyun-Ah Lee  ;  Dae-Hyun Kim 
Citation
 BRAIN SCIENCES, Vol.11(7) : 870, 2021-06 
Journal Title
BRAIN SCIENCES
Issue Date
2021-06
Keywords
connectivity ; functional recovery ; gait ; neurorehabilitation ; stroke
Abstract
Gait dysfunction is a leading cause of long-term disability after stroke. The mechanisms underlying recovery of gait function are unknown. We retrospectively evaluated the association between structural connectivity and gait function in 127 patients with unilateral supratentorial stroke (>1 month after stroke). All patients underwent T1-weighted, diffusion tensor imaging and functional ambulation categorization. Voxel-wise linear regression analyses of the images were conducted using fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and mode of anisotropy mapping as dependent variables, while the functional ambulation category was used as an independent variable with age and days after stroke as covariates. The functional ambulation category was positively associated with increased fractional anisotropy in the lesioned cortico-ponto-cerebellar system, corona radiata of the non-lesioned corticospinal tract pathway, bilateral medial lemniscus in the brainstem, and the corpus callosum. The functional ambulation category was also positively associated with increased mode of anisotropy in the lesioned posterior corpus callosum. In conclusion, structural connectivity associated with motor coordination and feedback affects gait function after stroke. Diffusion tensor imaging for evaluating structural connectivity can help to predict gait recovery and target rehabilitation goals after stroke.
Files in This Item:
T202103187.pdf Download
DOI
10.3390/brainsci11070870
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Rehabilitation Medicine (재활의학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Kim, Dae Hyun(김대현)
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/184574
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