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Quantitative light-induced fluorescence as a potential tool for detection of enamel chemical composition

Authors
 Joo-Young Lee  ;  Hyo-Jung Kim  ;  Eun-Song Lee  ;  Elbert de Josselin de Jong  ;  Hoi-In Jung  ;  Baek-Il Kim 
Citation
 PHOTODIAGNOSIS AND PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY, Vol.32 : 102054, 2020-12 
Journal Title
 PHOTODIAGNOSIS AND PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY 
ISSN
 1572-1000 
Issue Date
2020-12
Keywords
Raman spectrometry ; autofluorescence ; chemical composition ; enamel ; quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) technology ; tooth color
Abstract
Background: Little is known about how the chemical composition of enamel affects the optical properties of teeth, but advances in technology allow this to be studied using white-light and fluorescent images. This study aimed to identify the variation in enamel chemical composition that may affect tooth optical properties, such as tooth color and autofluorescence. Methods: Sixty-one specimens of extracted human molars were prepared. Raman spectrometry was used to assess chemical composition of enamel, and tooth color, and autofluorescence from enamel were evaluated by quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) images. Pearson correlation and multiple linear regression analyses were used. Results: Enamel fluorescence was related to enamel composition rather than tooth color. Theb* value from the fluorescence image had a moderate correlation with crystallinity (full-width at half-maximum: r = -0.433, p < 0.001) and laser-induced fluorescence intensity (r = 0.450, p < 0.001) from Raman spectroscopy. In multiple linear regression analysis, the chemical composition of the tooth had a significant effect on the b* value from the fluorescent image (R2 = 0.433, p < 0.001). In contrast, tooth color values (L*, a*, and b*) were not correlated with chemical composition. Conclusions: The present study revealed that enamel autofluorescence in QLF was related to chemical composition of the enamel, particularly the inorganic‒organic interface. While enamel chemical composition can be detected only in a laboratory environment, enamel fluorescence by QLF may enable estimation in a dental clinical, which has implications for the field of tooth bleaching or esthetic restorative materials.
Full Text
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1572100020304087
DOI
10.1016/j.pdpdt.2020.102054
Appears in Collections:
2. College of Dentistry (치과대학) > Dept. of Preventive Dentistry and Public Oral Health (예방치과학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Kim, Baek Il(김백일) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8234-2327
Lee, Eun Song(이은송) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2949-4783
Lee, Joo-Young(이주영)
Jung, Hoi In(정회인) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1978-6926
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/180680
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