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Associations between social network properties and metabolic syndrome and the mediating effect of physical activity: findings from the Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases Etiology Research Center (CMERC) Cohort

Authors
 Kwanghyun Kim  ;  Sun Jae Jung  ;  Jong Min Baek  ;  Hyeon Woo Yim  ;  Hyunsuk Jeong  ;  Dae Jung Kim  ;  Sungha Park  ;  Yoosik Youm  ;  Hyeon Chang Kim 
Citation
 BMJ OPEN DIABETES RESEARCH & CARE, Vol.8(1) : e001272, 2020-07 
Journal Title
 BMJ OPEN DIABETES RESEARCH & CARE 
Issue Date
2020-07
Keywords
metabolic syndrome ; physical activity and health ; public health ; social determina
Abstract
Introduction: Social isolation and loneliness are positively associated with metabolic syndrome. However, the mechanisms by which social isolation affects metabolic syndrome are not well understood. Research design and methods: This study was designed as a cross-sectional study of baseline results from the Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases Etiology Research Center (CMERC) Cohort. We included 10 103 participants (8097 community-based low-risk participants, 2006 hospital-based high-risk participants) from the CMERC Cohort. Participants aged 65 years or older were excluded. Multiple imputation by chained equations was applied to impute missing variables. The quantitative properties of social networks were assessed by measuring the 'size of social networks'; qualitative properties were assessed by measuring the 'social network closeness'. Metabolic syndrome was defined based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess association between social network properties and metabolic syndrome. The mediating effects of physical inactiveness, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and depressive symptoms were estimated. Age-specific effect sizes were estimated for each subgroup. Results: A smaller social network was positively associated with higher prevalences of metabolic syndrome in all subgroups, except the high-risk male subgroup. There was no clear association between social network closeness and metabolic syndrome. In community-based participants, an indirect effect through physical activity was detected in both sexes; however, in hospital-based participants, no indirect effects were detected. Cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and depression did not mediate the association. Age-specific estimates showed that the indirect effect through physical activity had a greater impact in older participants. Conclusions: A smaller social network is positively associated with metabolic syndrome. This trend could be partially explained by physical inactivity, especially in older individuals.
Files in This Item:
T202002854.pdf Download
DOI
10.1136/bmjdrc-2020-001272
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Internal Medicine (내과학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Preventive Medicine and Public Health (예방의학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Kim, Hyeon Chang(김현창) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7867-1240
Park, Sung Ha(박성하) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5362-478X
Jung, Sun Jae(정선재) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5194-7339
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/179477
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