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Insights into the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in skin function and associated diseases

Authors
 Kyungho Park  ;  Sang Eun Lee  ;  Kyong‐Oh Shin  ;  Yoshikazu Uchida 
Citation
 FEBS Journal, Vol.286(2) : 413-425, 2019 
Journal Title
FEBS JOURNAL
ISSN
 1742-464X 
Issue Date
2019
MeSH
Animals ; Endoplasmic Reticulum/metabolism ; Endoplasmic Reticulum/pathology* ; Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress* ; Humans ; Protein Folding ; Signal Transduction ; Skin/metabolism* ; Skin Diseases/physiopathology* ; Unfolded Protein Response*
Keywords
endoplasmic reticulum stress ; skin disease ; skin function ; unfolded protein response
Abstract
Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a mechanism that allows the protection of normal cellular functions in response to both internal perturbations, such as accumulation of unfolded proteins, and external perturbations, for example redox stress, UVB irradiation, and infection. A hallmark of ER stress is the accumulation of misfolded and unfolded proteins. Physiological levels of ER stress trigger the unfolded protein response (UPR) that is required to restore normal ER functions. However, the UPR can also initiate a cell death program/apoptosis pathway in response to excessive or persistent ER stress. Recently, it has become evident that chronic ER stress occurs in several diseases, including skin diseases such as Darier's disease, rosacea, vitiligo and melanoma; furthermore, it is suggested that ER stress is directly involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders. Here, we review the role of ER stress in skin function, and discuss its significance in skin diseases.
Full Text
https://febs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/febs.14739
DOI
10.1111/febs.14739
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Dermatology (피부과학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Lee, Sang Eun(이상은) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4720-9955
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/173358
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