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Comparison of Internal Adaptation in Class II Bulk-fill Composite Restorations Using Micro-CT

Authors
 SH Han  ;  SH Park 
Citation
 OPERATIVE DENTISTRY, Vol.42(2) : 203-214, 2017 
Journal Title
OPERATIVE DENTISTRY
ISSN
 0361-7734 
Issue Date
2017
MeSH
Composite Resins/chemistry* ; Dental Marginal Adaptation ; Dental Restoration, Permanent/methods* ; Dentin-Bonding Agents ; Humans ; In Vitro Techniques ; Light-Curing of Dental Adhesives ; Molar, Third ; Polymerization ; Random Allocation ; Surface Properties ; X-Ray Microtomography*
Abstract
PURPOSE: This study compared the internal adaptation of bulk-fill composite restorations in class II cavities and explored the relationship between internal adaptation and polymerization shrinkage or stress.

METHODS AND MATERIALS: Standardized mesio-occluso-distal cavities were prepared in 40 extracted human third molars and randomly divided into five groups (n=8). After having been applied by total-etch XP bond (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE, USA) and light curing, the teeth were restored with the following resin composites: group 1, Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA); group 2, SDR (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE, USA) + Z350; group 3, Venus Bulk Fill (Heraeus Kulzer, Dormagen, Germany) + Z350; group 4, Tetric N-Ceram Bulk Fill (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein); and group 5, SonicFill (Kerr, West Collins, Orange, CA, USA). After thermo-mechanical load cycling, cross-sectional microcomputerized tomography (micro-CT) images were taken. Internal adaptation was measured as imperfect margin percentage (IM%), which was the percentage of defective margin length relative to whole margin length. On the micro-CT images, IM% was measured at five interfaces. Linear polymerization shrinkage (LS) and polymerization shrinkage stress (PS) were measured on each composite with a custom linometer and universal testing machine. To explore the correlation of IM% and LS or PS, the Pearson correlation test was used.

RESULTS: The IM% of the gingival and pulpal cavity floors were inferior to those of the cavity walls. The IM% values of the groups were found to be as follows: group 5 ≤ groups 1 and 4 ≤ group 2 ≤ group 3. The correlation analysis showed that the p value was 0.006 between LS and IM% and 0.003 between PS and IM%, indicating significant correlations (p<0.05).

CONCLUSION: Flowable bulk-fill composites had a higher IM% and polymerization shrinkage stress than did packable bulk-fill and hybrid composites. In class II composite restoration, the gingival floor of the proximal box and pulpal floor of the cavity had higher IM% than did the buccal and lingual walls of the proximal box. LS and PS, which were measured under compliance-allowed conditions, were significantly related to internal adaptation.
Full Text
http://www.jopdentonline.org/doi/abs/10.2341/16-023-L
DOI
10.2341/16-023-L
Appears in Collections:
2. College of Dentistry (치과대학) > Dept. of Conservative Dentistry (보존과학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Park, Sung Ho(박성호) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2171-235X
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/154478
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