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Association between job stress and occupational injuries among Korean firefighters: a nationwide cross-sectional study

Authors
 Yeong-Kwang Kim  ;  Yeon-Soon Ahn  ;  KyooSang Kim  ;  Jin-Ha Yoon  ;  Jaehoon Roh 
Citation
 BMJ OPEN, Vol.6(11) : 012002, 2016 
Journal Title
 BMJ OPEN 
Issue Date
2016
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We aimed to assess the nature of association between job stress and occupational injuries among firefighters in Korea. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: We conducted a nationwide survey using self-reported questionnaires in South Korea. PARTICIPANTS: A survey was conducted among 30?630 firefighters; 25?616 (83.6%) responded. Our study included firefighters who were 20-59?years old. Individuals with <12?months of current job experience and those with missing data were excluded; ultimately, 14?991 firefighters were analysed. RESULTS: Among fire suppression personnel, high job demands (OR=1.49, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.77), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.18, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.37), a poor organisational system (OR=1.33, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.55), and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.41, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.64) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injury; high job demands (OR=1.22, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.47) were also associated with the frequency of injuries. Among emergency medical services personnel, high job demands (OR=1.26, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.54), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.40, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.66), a poor organisational system (OR=1.55, 95% CI 1.30 to 1.85), lack of reward (OR=1.43, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.69) and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.30, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.54) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injury; low job control (OR=1.20, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.38), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.18, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.36), lack of reward (OR=1.17, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.35) and a negative workplace climate (OR=1.16, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.34) were also associated with a greater number of injuries. Among officers, high job demands (OR=1.96, 95% CI 1.35 to 2.85) and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.54, 95% CI 1.13 to 2.10) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injuries; however, there was no significant correlation between job stress and the number of injuries. CONCLUSIONS: High job stress among firefighters was associated with both the occurrence of occupational injury, and also with an increased frequency of injuries. Therefore, job stress should be addressed to prevent occupational injuries among firefighters.
Files in This Item:
T201605768.pdf Download
DOI
10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012002
Appears in Collections:
4. Graduate School of Public Health (보건대학원) > Graduate School of Public Health (보건대학원) > 1. Journal Papers
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Preventive Medicine and Public Health (예방의학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
5. Research Institutes (연구소) > Institute for Occupational Health (산업보건연구소) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Kim, Yeong Kwang(김영광)
Roh, Jae Hoon(노재훈)
Yoon, Jin Ha(윤진하) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4198-2955
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/152940
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