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Is one's usual dinner companion associated with greater odds of depression? Using data from the 2014 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

Authors
 Sang Ah Lee  ;  Eun-Cheol Park  ;  Yeong Jun Ju  ;  Jin Young Nam  ;  Tae Hyun Kim 
Citation
 INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RHEUMATIC DISEASES, Vol.62(6) : 560-568, 2016 
Journal Title
 INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RHEUMATIC DISEASES 
ISSN
 1756-1841 
Issue Date
2016
MeSH
Adult ; Aged ; Aged, 80 and over ; Cross-Sectional Studies ; Depression/epidemiology* ; Family/psychology* ; Family Characteristics ; Feeding Behavior/psychology* ; Female ; Friends/psychology* ; Humans ; Logistic Models ; Loneliness/psychology ; Male ; Meals ; Middle Aged ; Nutrition Surveys ; Odds Ratio ; Republic of Korea ; Social Support* ; Young Adult
Keywords
Depression ; dinnertime ; eating behavior ; family
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Support from one's family has been reported to have a positive effect on depression severity. Hence, family dinnertimes, when whole family can gather together, can be effective to depression by providing support from family. AIMS: We investigate the association between the dinner companion and depression, and the differences in this association by gender, living arrangement and household composition. METHODS: We used the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2014 data. A total of 4,181 individuals were included. We classified participants by their dinner companions as follows: dinner with family, dinner with others and eating alone. Depression was measured by using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association. RESULT: Those who ate dinner alone (odds ratio (OR): 1.53, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04-2.25) had higher depression rate compared to those who had dinner with family. The subgroup analysis indicated that men, those who live with others and those living in a second-generation household who ate dinner alone had greater odds of having depressive symptoms. CONCLUSION: Those who usually eat dinner alone have greater odds of developing depression compared to those who have dinner with their family. As such, family dinnertimes may help to alleviate depressive moods.
Full Text
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abstract/10.1177/0020764016654505
DOI
10.1177/0020764016654505
Appears in Collections:
4. Graduate School of Public Health (보건대학원) > Graduate School of Public Health (보건대학원) > 1. Journal Papers
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Preventive Medicine and Public Health (예방의학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Kim, Tae Hyun(김태현) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1053-8958
Nam, Jin Young(남진영)
Park, Eun-Cheol(박은철) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2306-5398
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/151949
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