0 125

Cited 3 times in

The effect of childhood and current economic status on depressive symptoms in South Korean individuals: a longitudinal study

Authors
 Woorim Kim  ;  Tae Hyun Kim  ;  Tae-Hoon Lee  ;  Yeong Jun Ju  ;  Eun-Cheol Park 
Citation
 INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR EQUITY IN HEALTH, Vol.15 : 111, 2016 
Journal Title
 INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR EQUITY IN HEALTH 
Issue Date
2016
MeSH
Adult ; Depression/epidemiology* ; Depressive Disorder/epidemiology* ; Family Characteristics* ; Female ; Health Status Disparities* ; Humans ; Logistic Models ; Longitudinal Studies ; Male ; Mental Health/statistics & numerical data* ; Middle Aged ; Poverty/statistics & numerical data* ; Republic of Korea ; Socioeconomic Factors
Keywords
Childhood income ; Current income ; Depressive symptoms ; Health inequality ; Income inequality ; Intergenerational material transfer ; Mental health
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mental health inequality along the economic strata is prominent in South Korea, particularly as intergenerational material transfer is becoming increasingly important in gaining economic status. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the relationship between current and childhood economic status and depressive symptoms in adults aged 20 or above. METHODS: This study used data from the Korean Welfare Panel Study (KOWEPS), 2010 to 2013. A total of 9,645 individuals aged 20 years or above without depressive symptoms in 2010 were analyzed. The effect of childhood and current economic status, categorized into low, middle, and high groups, on depressive symptoms was investigated using hierarchical logistic regression models. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D 11) scale. Subgroup analysis was performed based on education level. RESULTS: Compared to the middle current-middle childhood economic status group, the low-low group (OR: 1.88, CI: 1.61-2.20), low-middle group (OR: 1.68, CI: 1.43-1.98), and low-high group (OR: 1.64, CI: 1.34-2.01) were more likely to have depressive symptoms. The high-low group (OR: 0.68, CI: 0.55-0.84), high-middle group (OR: 0.67, CI: 0.56-0.81), and high-high group (OR: 0.45, CI: 0.27-0.75) were less likely to have depressive symptoms. This trend was generally maintained with regard to education level, but the effects were not statistically significant in the high current economic status groups among participants with a university degree or above. CONCLUSION: Low current economic status was associated with a higher likelihood of depressive symptoms. In particular, the low current-low childhood economic status group showed the highest likelihood of depressive symptoms, suggesting the adverse mental health effects of prolonged poverty. Therefore, the findings reveal that mental health inequalities are present along the economic strata and require proper addressing of the mental health of lower income individuals.
DOI
10.1186/s12939-016-0402-0
Appears in Collections:
4. Graduate School of Public Health (보건대학원) > Graduate School of Public Health (보건대학원) > 1. Journal Papers
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Preventive Medicine and Public Health (예방의학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Kim, Tae Hyun(김태현) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1053-8958
Park, Eun-Cheol(박은철) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2306-5398
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/151608
사서에게 알리기
  feedback

qrcode

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse