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The injured brain interacts reciprocally with scaffolds seeded with neural stem cells to reconstitute lost tissue.

Authors
 Kook In Park  ;  Yang D. Teng  ;  Evan Y. Snyder 
Citation
 Nature Biotechnology, Vol.20(11) : 1111-1117, 2002 
Journal Title
 Nature Biotechnology 
ISSN
 1087-0156 
Issue Date
2002
Abstract
Hypoxic-ischemic injury is a prototype for insults characterized by extensive tissue loss. Seeding neural stem cells (NSCs) onto a polymer scaffold that was subsequently implanted into the infarction cavities of mouse brains injured by hypoxia-ischemia allowed us to observe the multiple reciprocal interactions that spontaneously ensue between NSCs and the extensively damaged brain: parenchymal loss was dramatically reduced, an intricate meshwork of many highly arborized neurites of both host- and donor-derived neurons emerged, and some anatomical connections appeared to be reconstituted. The NSC–scaffold complex altered the trajectory and complexity of host cortical neurites. Reciprocally, donor-derived neurons were seemingly capable of directed, target-appropriate neurite outgrowth (extending axons to the opposite hemisphere) without specific external instruction, induction, or genetic manipulation of host brain or donor cells. These “biobridges” appeared to unveil or augment a constitutive reparative response by facilitating a series of reciprocal interactions between NSC and host, including promoting neuronal differentiation, enhancing the elaboration of neural processes, fostering the re-formation of cortical tissue, and promoting connectivity. Inflammation and scarring were also reduced, facilitating reconstitution.
Full Text
http://www.nature.com/nbt/journal/v20/n11/full/nbt751.html
DOI
10.1038/nbt751
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Pediatrics (소아청소년과학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Park, Kook In(박국인) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8499-9293
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/144250
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