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Cigarette Smoking, Alcohol Drinking, Hepatitis B, and Risk for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Korea

Authors
 Sun Ha Jee  ;  Heechoul Ohrr  ;  Jonathan M. Samet  ;  Jae Woong Sull 
Citation
 JNCI-JOURNAL OF THE NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE, Vol.96(24) : 1851-1856, 2004 
Journal Title
JNCI-JOURNAL OF THE NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE
ISSN
 0027-8874 
Issue Date
2004
MeSH
Adult ; Aged ; Alcohol Drinking/adverse effects ; Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology* ; Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology* ; Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/etiology* ; Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/mortality ; Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/virology ; Cohort Studies ; Confounding Factors (Epidemiology) ; Female ; Hepatitis B/complications ; Hepatitis B/epidemiology* ; Hepatitis B Surface Antigens/blood ; Humans ; Korea/epidemiology ; Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology* ; Liver Neoplasms/etiology* ; Liver Neoplasms/mortality ; Liver Neoplasms/virology ; Male ; Medical Record Linkage ; Middle Aged ; Proportional Hazards Models ; Prospective Studies ; Risk Assessment ; Risk Factors ; Smoking/adverse effects ; Smoking/epidemiology*
Keywords
smoking ; diabetes mellitus ; cancer ; hepatitis b ; alcohol drinking ; carcinoma ; hepatocellular ; follow-up ; hepatitis b surface antigens ; korea ; prospective studies ; mortality ; liver cancer
Abstract
BACKGROUND:
Liver cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, particularly in Asia and Africa, where infectious hepatitis and aflatoxin exposures are common. We conducted a prospective cohort study of liver cancer in Korea to assess the independent effects and interactions of smoking, alcohol consumption, and hepatitis B on risk of mortality from hepatocellular carcinoma.
METHODS:
From a total of 1,283,112 men and women free of cancer at baseline, 3807 died from liver cancer during follow-up from 1993 to 2002. All participants reported their smoking and alcohol consumption, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) status was documented for 47.2% of the participants. Relative risk and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of mortality from hepatocellular carcinoma were calculated using proportional hazards models adjusted for age, alcohol drinking, diabetes, and HBsAg status.
RESULTS:
Current smoking was associated with increased risk of mortality from hepatocellular carcinoma in men (RR = 1.4; 95% CI = 1.3 to 1.6) but not women (RR = 1.1; CI = 0.8 to 1.7). The relative risk of mortality from hepatocellular carcinoma for male HBsAg carriers was 24.3 (95% CI = 21.9 to 26.9) times that in HBsAg-negative males; the relative risk for HBsAg-positive women was 54.4 (95% CI = 24.8 to 119.5). Heavy alcohol drinking was associated with hepatocellular carcinoma mortality risk in the subgroup of men who were tested for HBsAg (RR =1.5; 95% CI = 1.2 to 2.0). There was no interaction among smoking, alcohol drinking, and HBsAg in terms of hepatocellular carcinoma mortality.
CONCLUSION:
Cigarette smoking, heavy alcohol consumption, and HBsAg were independently associated with increased risk of mortality from hepatocellular carcinoma but did not interact synergistically. The relatively higher increase in mortality from hepatocellular carcinoma in HBsAg-seropositive women compared with men merits further research.
PMID: 15601641 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Free full text
Files in This Item:
T200404030.pdf Download
DOI
10.1093/jnci/djh334
Appears in Collections:
4. Graduate School of Public Health (보건대학원) > Graduate School of Public Health (보건대학원) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Jee, Sun Ha(지선하) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9519-3068
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/112892
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