141 332

Cited 71 times in

Smoking and risk of tuberculosis incidence, mortality, and recurrence in South Korean men and women

Authors
 Sun Ha Jee  ;  Jonathan E. Golub  ;  Jaeseong Jo  ;  Il Su Park  ;  Heechoul Ohrr  ;  Jonathan M. Samet 
Citation
 AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, Vol.170(12) : 1478-1485, 2009 
Journal Title
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY
ISSN
 0002-9262 
Issue Date
2009
MeSH
Adult ; Age Factors ; Aged ; Aged, 80 and over ; Body Mass Index ; Female ; Humans ; Incidence ; Male ; Middle Aged ; Prevalence ; Proportional Hazards Models ; Prospective Studies ; Recurrence ; Republic of Korea/epidemiology ; Sex Factors ; Smoking/adverse effects* ; Smoking/epidemiology* ; Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/epidemiology* ; Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/etiology ; Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/mortality
Keywords
alcohol drinking ; incidence ; mortality ; recurrence ; smoking ; tuberculosis
Abstract
The authors explored the association of cigarette smoking with tuberculosis incidence, recurrence, and mortality. A 14-year prospective cohort study (1992-2006) was carried out in 1,294,504 South Koreans. Participants were grouped by smoking history, and the authors assessed tuberculosis incidence, mortality, and recurrence risk for each group. Unadjusted and adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate the association between smoking history and the 3 outcomes of interest, adjusting for age and alcohol use. Compared with never smokers, current smokers had increased mortality from tuberculosis among both men (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3, 2.0) and women (HR = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.4). Current male smokers had greater risk of incident tuberculosis than former smokers (HR = 1.4, 95% CI: 1.3, 1.5), and risk among current smokers increased with number of cigarettes smoked daily. In females, cigarette smoking was not associated with incident tuberculosis. There was interaction between smoking and sex for incidence (P = 0.00047). The effect of smoking was generally reduced with adjustment for body mass index. Among men, the highest alcohol consumption category (> or =100 g/day) was associated with risk of incident tuberculosis (HR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.3, 1.7). This study provides longitudinal evidence that smoking increases risk of incident tuberculosis, mortality from tuberculosis, and tuberculosis recurrence
Files in This Item:
T200904899.pdf Download
DOI
10.1093/aje/kwp308
Appears in Collections:
4. Graduate School of Public Health (보건대학원) > Graduate School of Public Health (보건대학원) > 1. Journal Papers
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Preventive Medicine and Public Health (예방의학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Ohrr, Hee Choul(오희철)
Jee, Sun Ha(지선하) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9519-3068
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/105555
사서에게 알리기
  feedback

qrcode

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse

Links