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Metabolic syndrome and its association with white blood cell count in children and adolescents in Korea: the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Authors
 Y.-J. Lee  ;  Y.-H. Shin  ;  J.-K. Kim  ;  J.-Y. Shim  ;  D.-R. Kang  ;  H.-R. Lee 
Citation
 NUTRITION METABOLISM AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES, Vol.20(3) : 165-172, 2010 
Journal Title
 NUTRITION METABOLISM AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES 
ISSN
 0939-4753 
Issue Date
2010
MeSH
Adolescent ; Blood Glucose/analysis ; Blood Pressure ; Body Mass Index ; Child ; Cholesterol/blood ; Cross-Sectional Studies ; Energy Intake ; Fasting ; Female ; Humans ; Leukocyte Count* ; Male ; Metabolic Syndrome/blood* ; Metabolic Syndrome/complications ; Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology ; Nutrition Surveys ; Obesity/complications ; Obesity/epidemiology ; Odds Ratio ; Republic of Korea/epidemiology ; Sex Factors ; Triglycerides/blood ; Waist Circumference
Keywords
Metabolic syndrome ; Inflammation ; Prevalence ; White blood cell count
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and determine its association with white blood cell (WBC) count as a marker of low-grade systemic inflammation in children and adolescents in Korea. METHODS AND RESULTS: We investigated the prevalence of MS and its association with WBC count in 928 children and adolescents. MS was defined as having 3 or more conditions based on the modified criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III). The odds ratios (ORs) for MS were also calculated using multivariate logistic regression analysis across WBC count quartiles (Q1, <5200; Q2, 5200-6100; Q3, 6200-7200; and Q4, >or=7300 cells/microL for boys; Q1, <5200; Q2, 5200-6000; Q3, 6100-7000; and Q4, >or=7100 cells/microL for girls). The prevalence of MS in children and adolescents in Korea was 6.7% (8.5% in boys, 4.5% in girls, P<0.001). MS was more prevalent in overweight and obese children and adolescents in both boys and girls. The mean WBC counts continuously increased with each additional component of MS in both boys and girls. The ORs (95% CIs) for MS in each WBC quartile were 1.00, 1.56 (0.43-5.67), 4.47 (1.42-14.07), and 5.25 (1.71-16.07) in boys and 1.00, 1.05 (0.15-7.61), 2.89 (0.55-15.17), and 7.47 (1.61-36.67) in girls after adjusting for age, household income, and residential area. CONCLUSION: In summary, this study shows that a substantial number of children and adolescents in Korea have MS, and elevated WBC count may be a surrogate marker for MS.
Full Text
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0939475309000726
DOI
10.1016/j.numecd.2009.03.017
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Family Medicine (가정의학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Kim, Jong Koo(김종구)
Shim, Jae Yong(심재용) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9561-9230
Lee, Yong Jae(이용제) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6697-476X
Lee, Hye Ree(이혜리)
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/100791
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