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Vascular tube formation and angiogenesis induced by polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.author최인홍-
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-20T17:06:56Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-20T17:06:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.issn0378-4274-
dc.identifier.urihttps://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/93990-
dc.description.abstractSilver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most commonly used nanomaterials due to their antibacterial properties. In this study, we examined the effects of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-coated AgNPs (average size 2.3nm) on angiogenesis in both an in vivo model and an in vitro endothelial cell line, SVEC4-10. Increased angiogenesis was detected around the injection site of AgNP-containing Matrigel in vivo. AgNPs also increased the infiltration of endothelial cells and the hemoglobin (Hb) content in AgNP-Matrigel plugs implanted into mice. AgNPs induced endothelial cell tube formation on growth factor-reduced Matrigel, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and production of angiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nitric oxide (NO), in SVEC4-10 cells. In addition, AgNPs promoted the activation of FAK, Akt, ERK1/2, and p38, which are all involved in VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-mediated signaling. Finally, AgNP-treated tumors caused angiogenesis around tumors in B16F10 melanomas after they were injected into mice, and the Hb concentration in the tumors increased in a concentration-dependent manner with AgNP treatment. Thus, our study suggests that exposure to AgNPs can cause angiogenesis through the production of angiogenic factors.-
dc.description.statementOfResponsibilityopen-
dc.format.extent227~234-
dc.relation.isPartOfToxicology Letters-
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND 2.0 KR-
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/kr/-
dc.titleVascular tube formation and angiogenesis induced by polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.collegeCollege of Medicine (의과대학)-
dc.contributor.departmentDept. of Microbiology (미생물학)-
dc.contributor.googleauthorKyeongah Kang-
dc.contributor.googleauthorDae-Hyoun Lim-
dc.contributor.googleauthorIn-Hong Choi-
dc.contributor.googleauthorTaegyeong Kang-
dc.contributor.googleauthorKangtaek Lee-
dc.contributor.googleauthorEun-Yi Moon-
dc.contributor.googleauthorYoung Yang-
dc.contributor.googleauthorMyeong-Sok Lee-
dc.contributor.googleauthorJong-Seok Lim-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.toxlet.2011.05.1033-
dc.admin.authorfalse-
dc.admin.mappingfalse-
dc.contributor.localIdA04167-
dc.relation.journalcodeJ02744-
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378427411012513-
dc.contributor.alternativeNameChoi, In Hong-
dc.contributor.affiliatedAuthorChoi, In Hong-
dc.rights.accessRightsnot free-
dc.citation.volume205-
dc.citation.number3-
dc.citation.startPage227-
dc.citation.endPage234-
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationToxicology Letters, Vol.205(3) : 227-234, 2011-
Appears in Collections:
1. Journal Papers (연구논문) > 1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Microbiology (미생물학교실)

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