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Emotion-on-a-chip (EOC): evolution of biochip technology to measure human emotion using body fluids.

Authors
 Jung-Hyun Lee  ;  Yoosun Hwang  ;  Keun-Ah Cheon  ;  Hyo-Il Jung 
Citation
 Medical Hypotheses, Vol.79(6) : 827-832, 2012 
Journal Title
 Medical Hypotheses 
ISSN
 0306-9877 
Issue Date
2012
Abstract
Recent developments in nano/micro technology have made it possible to construct small-scale sensing chips for the analysis of biological markers such as nucleic acids, proteins, small molecules, and cells. Although biochip technology for the diagnosis of severe physiological diseases (e.g., cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease) has been extensively studied, biochips for the monitoring of human emotions such as stress, fear, depression, and sorrow have not yet been introduced, and the development of such a biochip is in its infancy. Emotion science (or affective engineering) is a rapidly expanding engineering/scientific discipline that has a major impact on human society. The growing interest in the integration of emotion science and engineering is a result of the recent trend of merging various academic fields. In this paper we discuss the potential importance of biochip technology in which human emotion can be precisely measured in real time using body fluids such as blood, saliva, urine, or sweat. We call these biochips emotion-on-a-chip (EOC). The EOC system consists of four parts: (1) collection of body fluids, (2) separation of emotional markers, (3) detection of optical or electrical signals, and (4) display of results. These techniques provide new opportunities to precisely investigate human emotion. Future developments in EOC techniques will combine social and natural sciences to expand their scope of study.
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/91442
DOI
10.1016/j.mehy.2012.09.002
Appears in Collections:
1. Journal Papers (연구논문) > 1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Psychiatry (정신과학교실)
Yonsei Authors
천근아(Cheon, Keun Ah)
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Full Text
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S030698771200415X
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