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Pain and mild cognitive impairment among adults aged 50 years and above residing in low- and middle-income countries

Authors
 Lee Smith  ;  Guillermo F López Sánchez  ;  Jae Il Shin  ;  Pinar Soysal  ;  Damiano Pizzol  ;  Yvonne Barnett  ;  Karel Kostev  ;  Louis Jacob  ;  Nicola Veronese  ;  Laurie Butler  ;  Helen Odell-Miller  ;  Jodie Bloska  ;  Benjamin R Underwood  ;  Ai Koyanagi 
Citation
 AGING CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH, Vol.35(7) : 1513-1520, 2023-07 
Journal Title
AGING CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH
ISSN
 1594-0667 
Issue Date
2023-07
MeSH
Aged ; Cognitive Dysfunction* / etiology ; Cross-Sectional Studies ; Developing Countries* ; Female ; Humans ; Male ; Middle Aged ; Mobility Limitation ; Pain / epidemiology ; Prevalence
Keywords
Epidemiology ; Low- and middle-income countries ; Mild cognitive impairment ; Pain
Abstract
BackgroundPrevious studies on the association between pain and cognitive decline or impairment have yielded mixed results, while studies from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) or specifically on mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are scarce. Thus, we investigated the association between pain and MCI in LMICs and quantified the extent to which perceived stress, sleep/energy problems, and mobility limitations explain the pain/MCI relationship.MethodsData analysis of cross-sectional data from six LMICs from the Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE) were performed. MCI was based on the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association criteria. "Overall in the last 30 days, how much of bodily aches or pain did you have?" was the question utilized to assess pain. Associations were examined by multivariable logistic regression analysis and meta-analysis.ResultsData on 32,715 individuals aged 50 years and over were analysed [mean (SD) age 62.1 (15.6) years; 51.7% females]. In the overall sample, compared to no pain, mild, moderate, and severe/extreme pain were dose-dependently associated with 1.36 (95% CI = 1.18-1.55), 2.15 (95% CI = 1.77-2.62), and 3.01 (95% CI = 2.36-3.85) times higher odds for MCI, respectively. Mediation analysis showed that perceived stress, sleep/energy problems, and mobility limitations explained 10.4%, 30.6%, and 51.5% of the association between severe/extreme pain and MCI.ConclusionsAmong middle-aged to older adults from six LMICs, pain was associated with MCI dose-dependently, and sleep problems and mobility limitations were identified as potential mediators. These findings raise the possibility of pain as a modifiable risk factor for developing MCI.
Files in This Item:
T202400312.pdf Download
DOI
10.1007/s40520-023-02434-7
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Pediatrics (소아과학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Shin, Jae Il(신재일) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2326-1820
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/197878
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