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Balancing risks and benefits of cannabis use: umbrella review of meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials and observational studies

Authors
 Marco Solmi  ;  Marco De Toffol  ;  Jong Yeob Kim  ;  Min Je Choi  ;  Brendon Stubbs  ;  Trevor Thompson  ;  Joseph Firth  ;  Alessandro Miola  ;  Giovanni Croatto  ;  Francesca Baggio  ;  Silvia Michelon  ;  Luca Ballan  ;  Björn Gerdle  ;  Francesco Monaco  ;  Pierluigi Simonato  ;  Paolo Scocco  ;  Valdo Ricca  ;  Giovanni Castellini  ;  Michele Fornaro  ;  Andrea Murru  ;  Eduard Vieta  ;  Paolo Fusar-Poli  ;  Corrado Barbui  ;  John P A Ioannidis  ;  Andrè F Carvalho  ;  Joaquim Radua  ;  Christoph U Correll  ;  Samuele Cortese  ;  Robin M Murray  ;  David Castle  ;  Jae Il Shin  ;  Elena Dragioti 
Citation
 BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol.382 : e072348, 2023-08 
Journal Title
BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL
ISSN
 0959-8138 
Issue Date
2023-08
MeSH
Adolescent ; Adult ; Cannabidiol* ; Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists ; Cannabis* ; Chronic Pain* ; Female ; Hallucinogens* ; Humans ; Infant, Newborn ; Meta-Analysis as Topic ; Observational Studies as Topic ; Pregnancy ; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic ; Risk Assessment ; Sleepiness ; Systematic Reviews as Topic
Abstract
Objective: To systematically assess credibility and certainty of associations between cannabis, cannabinoids, and cannabis based medicines and human health, from observational studies and randomised controlled trials (RCTs).

Design: Umbrella review.

Data sources: PubMed, PsychInfo, Embase, up to 9 February 2022.

Eligibility criteria for selecting studies: Systematic reviews with meta-analyses of observational studies and RCTs that have reported on the efficacy and safety of cannabis, cannabinoids, or cannabis based medicines were included. Credibility was graded according to convincing, highly suggestive, suggestive, weak, or not significant (observational evidence), and by GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations) (RCTs). Quality was assessed with AMSTAR 2 (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews 2). Sensitivity analyses were conducted.

Results: 101 meta-analyses were included (observational=50, RCTs=51) (AMSTAR 2 high 33, moderate 31, low 32, or critically low 5). From RCTs supported by high to moderate certainty, cannabis based medicines increased adverse events related to the central nervous system (equivalent odds ratio 2.84 (95% confidence interval 2.16 to 3.73)), psychological effects (3.07 (1.79 to 5.26)), and vision (3.00 (1.79 to 5.03)) in people with mixed conditions (GRADE=high), improved nausea/vomit, pain, spasticity, but increased psychiatric, gastrointestinal adverse events, and somnolence among others (GRADE=moderate). Cannabidiol improved 50% reduction of seizures (0.59 (0.38 to 0.92)) and seizure events (0.59 (0.36 to 0.96)) (GRADE=high), but increased pneumonia, gastrointestinal adverse events, and somnolence (GRADE=moderate). For chronic pain, cannabis based medicines or cannabinoids reduced pain by 30% (0.59 (0.37 to 0.93), GRADE=high), across different conditions (n=7), but increased psychological distress. For epilepsy, cannabidiol increased risk of diarrhoea (2.25 (1.33 to 3.81)), had no effect on sleep disruption (GRADE=high), reduced seizures across different populations and measures (n=7), improved global impression (n=2), quality of life, and increased risk of somnolence (GRADE=moderate). In the general population, cannabis worsened positive psychotic symptoms (5.21 (3.36 to 8.01)) and total psychiatric symptoms (7.49 (5.31 to 10.42)) (GRADE=high), negative psychotic symptoms, and cognition (n=11) (GRADE=moderate). In healthy people, cannabinoids improved pain threshold (0.74 (0.59 to 0.91)), unpleasantness (0.60 (0.41 to 0.88)) (GRADE=high). For inflammatory bowel disease, cannabinoids improved quality of life (0.34 (0.22 to 0.53) (GRADE=high). For multiple sclerosis, cannabinoids improved spasticity, pain, but increased risk of dizziness, dry mouth, nausea, somnolence (GRADE=moderate). For cancer, cannabinoids improved sleep disruption, but had gastrointestinal adverse events (n=2) (GRADE=moderate). Cannabis based medicines, cannabis, and cannabinoids resulted in poor tolerability across various conditions (GRADE=moderate). Evidence was convincing from observational studies (main and sensitivity analyses) in pregnant women, small for gestational age (1.61 (1.41 to 1.83)), low birth weight (1.43 (1.27 to 1.62)); in drivers, car crash (1.27 (1.21 to 1.34)); and in the general population, psychosis (1.71 (1.47 to 2.00)). Harmful effects were noted for additional neonatal outcomes, outcomes related to car crash, outcomes in the general population including psychotic symptoms, suicide attempt, depression, and mania, and impaired cognition in healthy cannabis users (all suggestive to highly suggestive).

Conclusions: Convincing or converging evidence supports avoidance of cannabis during adolescence and early adulthood, in people prone to or with mental health disorders, in pregnancy and before and while driving. Cannabidiol is effective in people with epilepsy. Cannabis based medicines are effective in people with multiple sclerosis, chronic pain, inflammatory bowel disease, and in palliative medicine but not without adverse events.

Study registration: PROSPERO CRD42018093045.

Funding: None.
Files in This Item:
T202306939.pdf Download
DOI
10.1136/bmj-2022-072348
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Pediatrics (소아과학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Shin, Jae Il(신재일) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2326-1820
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/197244
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