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Bipolar II disorder has the highest prevalence of seasonal affective disorder in early-onset mood disorders: Results from a prospective observational cohort study

Authors
 Ji Won Yeom  ;  Chul-Hyun Cho  ;  Sehyun Jeon  ;  Ju Yeon Seo  ;  Serhim Son  ;  Yong-Min Ahn  ;  Se Joo Kim  ;  Tae Hyon Ha  ;  Boseok Cha  ;  Eunsoo Moon  ;  Dong Yeon Park  ;  Ji Hyun Baek  ;  Hee-Ju Kang  ;  Hyonggin An  ;  Heon-Jeong Lee 
Citation
 DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY, Vol.38(6) : 661-670, 2021-06 
Journal Title
DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY
ISSN
 1091-4269 
Issue Date
2021-06
MeSH
Bipolar Disorder* / epidemiology ; Cohort Studies ; Depressive Disorder, Major* / epidemiology ; Humans ; Mood Disorders ; Prevalence ; Prospective Studies ; Seasonal Affective Disorder* / epidemiology ; Seasons
Keywords
bipolar disorder ; mood disorders ; seasonal affective disorder ; seasonal variation ; young adult
Abstract
Background: Many mood disorder patients experience seasonal changes in varying degrees. Studies on seasonality have shown that bipolar disorder has a higher prevalence rate in such patients; however, there is limited research on seasonality in early-onset mood disorder patients. This study estimated the prevalence of seasonality in early-onset mood disorder patients, and examined the association between seasonality and mood disorders.

Methods: Early-onset mood disorder patients (n = 378; 138 major depressive disorder; 101 bipolar I disorder; 139 bipolar II disorder) of the Mood Disorder Cohort Research Consortium and healthy control subjects (n = 235) were assessed for seasonality with Seasonality Pattern Assessment Questionnaire (SPAQ).

Results: A higher global seasonality score, an overall seasonal impairment score, and the prevalence of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and subsyndromal SAD showed that mood disorder subjects had higher seasonality than the healthy subjects. The former subject group had a significantly higher mean overall seasonal impairment score than the healthy subjects (p < .001); in particular, bipolar II disorder subjects had the highest prevalence of SAD, and the diagnosis of bipolar II disorder had significantly higher odds ratios for SAD when compared to major depression and bipolar I disorder (p < .05).

Conclusions: Early-onset mood disorders, especially bipolar II disorder, were associated with high seasonality. A thorough assessment of seasonality in early-onset mood disorders may be warranted for more personalized treatment and proactive prevention of mood episodes.
Full Text
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/da.23153
DOI
10.1002/da.23153
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Psychiatry (정신과학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Kim, Se Joo(김세주) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5438-8210
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/190913
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