0 75

Cited 0 times in

The association between objective vision impairment and mild cognitive impairment among older adults in low- and middle-income countries

Authors
 Lee Smith  ;  Jae Il Shin  ;  Louis Jacob  ;  Guillermo F López-Sánchez  ;  Hans Oh  ;  Yvonne Barnett  ;  Shahina Pardhan  ;  Laurie Butler  ;  Pinar Soysal  ;  Nicola Veronese  ;  Ai Koyanagi 
Citation
 AGING CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH, Vol.33(10) : 2695-2702, 2021-10 
Journal Title
AGING CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH
ISSN
 1594-0667 
Issue Date
2021-10
MeSH
Aged ; China ; Cognitive Dysfunction* / epidemiology ; Cross-Sectional Studies ; Developing Countries* ; Female ; Humans ; Male ; Prevalence
Keywords
Epidemiology ; Low- and middle-income countries ; Mild cognitive impairment ; Older adults ; Vision impairment
Abstract
Aim: The association between visual impairment and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has not been investigated to date. Thus, we assessed this association among older adults from six low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) (China, India, Ghana, Mexico, Russia, and South Africa) using nationally representative datasets.

Methods: Cross-sectional, community-based data from the WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) were analyzed. Visual acuity was measured using the tumbling ElogMAR chart, and vision impairment (at distance and near) was defined as visual acuity worse than 6/18 (0.48 logMAR) in the better-seeing eye. The definition of MCI was based on the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association criteria. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted.

Results: Data on 32,715 individuals aged ≥ 50 years [mean (SD) age 62.1 (15.6) years; 51.2% females] were analyzed. Compared to those without far or near vision impairment, those with near vision impairment but not far vision impairment (OR = 1.33; 95% CI = 1.16-1.52), and those with both far and near vision impairment (OR = 1.70; 95% CI = 1.27-2.29) had significantly higher odds for MCI. Only having far vision impairment was not significantly associated with MCI.

Conclusions: Visual impairment is associated with increased odds for MCI among older adults in LMICs with the exception of far vision impairment only. Future longitudinal and intervention studies should examine causality and whether improvements in visual acuity, or early intervention, can reduce risk for MCI and ultimately, dementia.
Full Text
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40520-021-01814-1
DOI
10.1007/s40520-021-01814-1
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Pediatrics (소아과학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Shin, Jae Il(신재일) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2326-1820
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/187475
사서에게 알리기
  feedback

qrcode

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse

Links