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Surgical Management of Intractable Epilepsy

Authors
 Chung, S.S.  ;  Lee, K.H.  ;  Chang, J.W.  ;  Park Y.G. 
Citation
 STEREOTACTIC AND FUNCTIONAL NEUROSURGERY, Vol.70(2~4) : 81-88, 1998 
Journal Title
 STEREOTACTIC AND FUNCTIONAL NEUROSURGERY 
ISSN
 1011-6125 
Issue Date
1998
MeSH
Adolescent ; Adult ; Child ; Corpus Callosum/surgery ; Electroencephalography ; Epilepsy/surgery* ; Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe/surgery ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Retrospective Studies ; Risk Assessment
Abstract
Cortical resective surgery (including amygdalohippocampectomy) and corpus callosotomy are the most widely accepted modes of surgical treatment for intractable epilepsy. Between July 1989 and May 1996, 146 surgeries for epilepsy were done at Severance Hospital, Yonsei University. Resective surgery was performed in 126 patients and corpus callosotomy in 20 patients. Of the 126 patients who underwent resective surgery, surgery for the removal of the epileptic lesion (lesionectomy) was performed in 21 patients (16.7%) while 105 patients (83.3%) underwent surgery without a structural lesion. Current surgical therapy for intractable epilepsy requires the precise localization of a resectable zone of epileptogenesis. Unfortunately, finding a localized focus in an extratemporal region is far more difficult than in the temporal lobe. Surgeries for extratemporal lobe epilepsy without lesions have been less successful than surgeries for temporal lobe epilepsy. Although surgery for intractable epilepsy has been increasingly successful, we still need to refine our techniques to further improve the success rate and to reduce complications of surgery such as language and memory impairment.
Full Text
http://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/29602
DOI
10.1159/000029602
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Neurosurgery (신경외과학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Chang, Jin Woo(장진우) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2717-0101
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/176938
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