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Association Between Income Disparities and Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease: A Nationwide Cohort Study of Seven Million Adults in Korea

Authors
 Tae Ik Chang  ;  Hyunsun Lim  ;  Cheol Ho Park  ;  Connie M. Rhee  ;  Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh  ;  Ea Wha Kang  ;  Shin-Wook Kang  ;  Seung Hyeok Han 
Citation
 MAYO CLINIC PROCEEDINGS, Vol.95(2) : 231-242, 2020 
Journal Title
 MAYO CLINIC PROCEEDINGS 
ISSN
 0025-6196 
Issue Date
2020
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between income level and incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) in adults with normal baseline kidney function. PATIENT AND METHODS: We studied the association between income level categorized into deciles and incident CKD in a national cohort comprised of 7,405,715 adults who underwent National Health Insurance Service health examinations during January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2015, with baseline estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Incident CKD was defined as de novo development of eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 (model 1) or ≥25% decline in eGFR from baseline values accompanied by eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 (model 2). RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 4.8 years, there were 122,032 of 7,405,715 (1.65%) and 55,779 of 7,405,715 (0.75%) incident CKD events based on model 1 and 2 definitions, respectively. Compared with income levels in the sixth decile, there was an inverse association between lower income level and higher risk for CKD up to the fourth decile, above which no additional reduction (model 1) or slightly higher risk for CKD (model 2) was observed at higher income levels. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios from the lowest to fourth deciles were 1.30 (95% CI, 1.26-1.33), 1.16 (95% CI, 1.13-1.19), 1.07 (95% CI, 1.05-1.10), and 1.06 (95% CI, 1.03-1.09) in model 1 and 1.32 (95% CI, 1.27-1.37), 1.18 (95% CI, 1.14-1.22), 1.08 (95% CI, 1.04-1.13), and 1.05 (95% CI, 1.01-1.09) in model 2, respectively. These associations persisted across various subgroups of age, sex, and comorbidity status. CONCLUSION: In this large nationwide cohort, lower income levels were associated with higher risk for incident CKD.
Full Text
https://www.clinicalkey.com/#!/content/playContent/1-s2.0-S0025619619309863
DOI
10.1016/j.mayocp.2019.09.028
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Internal Medicine (내과학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Microbiology (미생물학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Kang, Shin Wook(강신욱) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5677-4756
Park, Cheol Ho(박철호) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4636-5745
Han, Seung Hyeok(한승혁) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7923-5635
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/175306
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