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Decreased hemoglobin levels, cerebral small-vessel disease, and cortical atrophy: among cognitively normal elderly women and men

Authors
 Sang Eon Park  ;  Hojeong Kim  ;  Jeongmin Lee  ;  Na Kyung Lee  ;  Jung Won Hwang  ;  Jin-ju Yang  ;  Byoung Seok Ye  ;  Hanna Cho  ;  Hee Jin Kim  ;  Yeo Jin Kim  ;  Na-Yeon Jung  ;  Tae Ok Son  ;  Eun Bin Cho  ;  Hyemin Jang  ;  Eun Young Jang  ;  Chang Hyung Hong  ;  Jong-Min Lee  ;  Mira Kang  ;  Hee-Young Shin  ;  Duk L. Na  ;  Sang Won Seo 
Citation
 INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOGERIATRICS, Vol.28(1) : 147-156, 2016 
Journal Title
 INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOGERIATRICS 
ISSN
 1041-6102 
Issue Date
2016
MeSH
Aged ; Atrophy/pathology ; Brain Diseases/pathology* ; Cerebral Cortex/pathology* ; Cognition ; Female ; Healthy Volunteers ; Hemoglobins/analysis* ; Humans ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Male ; Middle Aged ; Multivariate Analysis ; Regression Analysis ; Republic of Korea
Keywords
anemia ; cerebral small-vessel disease (CSVD) ; cortical thickness ; dementia
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Decreased hemoglobin levels increase the risk of developing dementia among the elderly. However, the underlying mechanisms that link decreased hemoglobin levels to incident dementia still remain unclear, possibly due to the fact that few studies have reported on the relationship between low hemoglobin levels and neuroimaging markers. We, therefore, investigated the relationships between decreased hemoglobin levels, cerebral small-vessel disease (CSVD), and cortical atrophy in cognitively healthy women and men. METHODS: Cognitively normal women (n = 1,022) and men (n = 1,018) who underwent medical check-ups and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were enrolled at a health promotion center. We measured hemoglobin levels, white matter hyperintensities (WMH) scales, lacunes, and microbleeds. Cortical thickness was automatically measured using surface based methods. Multivariate regression analyses were performed after controlling for possible confounders. RESULTS: Decreased hemoglobin levels were not associated with the presence of WMH, lacunes, or microbleeds in women and men. Among women, decreased hemoglobin levels were associated with decreased cortical thickness in the frontal (Estimates, 95% confidence interval, -0.007, (-0.013, -0.001)), temporal (-0.010, (-0.018, -0.002)), parietal (-0.009, (-0.015, -0.003)), and occipital regions (-0.011, (-0.019, -0.003)). Among men, however, no associations were observed between hemoglobin levels and cortical thickness. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggested that decreased hemoglobin levels affected cortical atrophy, but not increased CSVD, among women, although the association is modest. Given the paucity of modifiable risk factors for age-related cognitive decline, our results have important public health implications.
Full Text
https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/international-psychogeriatrics/article/decreased-hemoglobin-levels-cerebral-smallvessel-disease-and-cortical-atrophy-among-cognitively-normal-elderly-women-and-men/A47AC7B9C98B946F1EF39C2518E4C985
DOI
10.1017/S1041610215000733
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Neurology (신경과학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Ye, Byoung Seok(예병석) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0187-8440
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/166121
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