0 11

Cited 0 times in

Entry Body Mass and Earnings: Once Penalized, Ever Penalized?

Authors
 Tae Hyun Kim  ;  Euna Han 
Citation
 Biodemography and Social Biology, Vol.63(4) : 332-346, 2017 
Journal Title
 Biodemography and Social Biology 
Issue Date
2017
Abstract
It has previously been reported that an individual's body mass index (BMI) contemporaneously penalizes wages for women, but has no effect and sometimes rewards wages for men. In young adults, we estimate the association of BMI status with initial wages to assess whether initial BMI at the beginning of an individual's career affects initial and later earnings. We pooled data from 388 men and 305 women, aged 20-40 years, with BMI information for the first year of employment, using the Korean Labor and Income Panel Study. A labor market penalty for a higher BMI among women was found only for overweight or obese segments, particularly those with relatively higher monthly wages. Meanwhile, a higher BMI in underweight or normal weight segments could reward employment probability for women and monthly wages for men. Such rewards of relatively higher monthly wages were also estimated for men in the overweight segment. Our findings suggest discrimination as one factor penalizing higher BMI in the labor market.
URI
http://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/161458
DOI
10.1080/19485565.2017.1403302
Appears in Collections:
1. Journal Papers (연구논문) > 4. Graduate School of Public Health (보건대학원) > Graduate School of Public Health (보건대학원)
Yonsei Authors
김태현(Kim, Tae Hyun)
사서에게 알리기
  feedback
Full Text
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19485565.2017.1403302
Export
RIS (EndNote)
XLS (Excel)
XML

qrcode

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse