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Active locomotion of a paddling-based capsule endoscope in an in vitro and in vivo experiment (with videos).

Authors
 Hee Man Kim  ;  Sungwook Yang  ;  Jinseok Kim  ;  Semi Park  ;  Jae Hee Cho  ;  Jeong Youp Park  ;  Tae Song Kim  ;  Eui-Sung Yoon  ;  Si Young Song  ;  Seungmin Bang 
Citation
 GASTROINTESTINAL ENDOSCOPY, Vol.72(2) : 381-387, 2010 
Journal Title
 GASTROINTESTINAL ENDOSCOPY 
ISSN
 0016-5107 
Issue Date
2010
MeSH
Animals ; Biomimetics/instrumentation* ; Capsule Endoscopes* ; Capsule Endoscopy/methods* ; Colonic Diseases/diagnosis* ; Disease Models, Animal ; Equipment Design ; Swine ; Video Recording
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Capsule endoscopy that could actively move and approach a specific site might be more valuable for the diagnosis or treatment of GI diseases. OBJECTIVE: We tested the performance of active locomotion of a novel wired capsule endoscope with a paddling-based locomotion mechanism, using 3 models: a silicone tube, an extracted porcine colon, and a living pig. DESIGN: In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments in a pig model. SETTING: Study in an animal laboratory. INTERVENTIONS: For the in vitro test, the locomotive capsule was controlled to actively move from one side of a silicone tube to the other by a controller-operated automatic traveling program. The velocity was calculated by following a video recording. We performed ex vivo tests by using an extracted porcine colon in the same manner we performed the in vitro test. In in vivo experiments, the capsule was inserted into the rectum of a living pig under anesthesia, and was controlled to move automatically forward. After 8 consecutive trials, the velocity was calculated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Elapsed time, velocity, and mucosal damage. RESULTS: The locomotive capsule showed stable and active movement inside the lumen both in vitro and ex vivo. The velocity was 60 cm/min in the silicone tube, and 36.8 and 37.5 cm/min in the extracted porcine colon. In the in vivo experiments, the capsule stably moved forward inside the colon of a living pig without any serious complications. The mean velocity was 17 cm/min over 40 cm length. We noted pinpoint erythematous mucosal injuries in the colon. LIMITATION: Porcine model experiments, wired capsule endoscope. CONCLUSIONS: The novel paddling-based locomotive capsule endoscope performed fast and stable movement in a living pig colon with consistent velocity. Further investigation is necessary for practical use in humans.
Full Text
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0016510710000143
DOI
10.1016/j.gie.2009.12.058
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Internal Medicine (내과학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Kim, Jin Seok(김진석) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8986-8436
Park, Jeong Youp(박정엽) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0110-8606
Bang, Seungmin(방승민) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5209-8351
Song, Si Young(송시영) ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1417-4314
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/101413
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