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Titrated propofol induction vs. continuous infusion in children undergoing magnetic resonance imaging

Authors
 J. E. CHO  ;  W. O. KIM  ;  D. J. CHANG  ;  E. M. CHOI  ;  S. Y. OH  ;  H. K. KIL 
Citation
 ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, Vol.54(4) : 453-457, 2010 
Journal Title
 ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA 
ISSN
 0001-5172 
Issue Date
2010
MeSH
Anesthesia Recovery Period ; Anesthetics, Intravenous*/administration & dosage ; Anesthetics, Intravenous*/adverse effects ; Blood Pressure/drug effects ; Carbon Dioxide/blood ; Child ; Child, Preschool ; Conscious Sedation/methods* ; Double-Blind Method ; Female ; Heart Rate/drug effects ; Humans ; Infant ; Infusions, Intravenous ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods* ; Male ; Oxygen/blood ; Patient Satisfaction ; Propofol*/administration & dosage ; Propofol*/adverse effects ; Respiratory Mechanics/drug effects ; Sample Size
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Propofol is the popular intravenous (i.v.) anaesthetic for paediatric sedation because of its rapid onset and recovery. We compared the efficacy and safety of a single dose and conventional infusion of propofol for sedation in children who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: This was a double-blind, randomized-controlled study. One hundred and sixty children were assigned to group I (single dose) or II (infusion). Sedation was induced with i.v. propofol 2 mg/kg, and supplemental doses of propofol 0.5 mg/kg were administered until adequate sedation was achieved. After the induction of sedation, we treated patients with a continuous infusion of normal saline at a rate of 0.3 ml/kg/h in group I and the same volume of propofol in group II. In case of inadequate sedation, additional propofol 0.5 mg/kg was administered and the infusion rate was increased by 0.05 ml/kg/h. Induction time, sedation time, recovery time, additional sedation and adverse events were recorded. RESULTS: Recovery time was significantly shorter in group I compared with group II [0 (0-3) vs. 1 (0-3), respectively, P<0.001]. Group I (single dose) had significantly more patients with recovery time 0 compared with group II (infusion) (65/80 vs. 36/80, respectively, P<0.001). Induction and sedation times were not significantly different between groups. There was no significant difference in the frequency of additional sedation and adverse events between groups. CONCLUSION: A single dose of propofol without a continuous infusion can provide appropriate sedation in children undergoing MRI for <30 min.
Full Text
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1399-6576.2009.02169.x/abstract
DOI
10.1111/j.1399-6576.2009.02169.x
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine (마취통증의학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Kil, Hae Keum(길혜금)
Kim, Won Oak(김원옥)
Cho, Jang Eun(조장은)
Choi, Eun Kyeong(최은경)
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/100707
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