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High temperature stimulates acetic acid accumulation and enhances the growth inhibition and ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under fermenting conditions

Authors
 Ji-Min Woo  ;  Kyung-Mi Yang  ;  Sae-Um Kim  ;  Lars M. Blank  ;  Jin-Byung Park 
Citation
 APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY, Vol.98(13) : 6085-6094, 2014 
Journal Title
 APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY 
ISSN
 0175-7598 
Issue Date
2014
MeSH
Acetic Acid/metabolism* ; Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism ; Carbon/metabolism ; Energy Metabolism ; Ethanol/metabolism* ; Fermentation ; Glucose/metabolism ; Metabolic Flux Analysis ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/growth & development ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolism* ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/radiation effects* ; Temperature
Keywords
Heat stress ; Acetic acid stress ; Oxidative stress ; Reactive oxygen species ; Carbon metabolism ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Abstract
Cellular responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to high temperatures of up to 42 °C during ethanol fermentation at a high glucose concentration (i.e., 100 g/L) were investigated. Increased temperature correlated with stimulated glucose uptake to produce not only the thermal protectant glycerol but also ethanol and acetic acid. Carbon flux into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle correlated positively with cultivation temperature. These results indicate that the increased demand for energy (in the form of ATP), most likely caused by multiple stressors, including heat, acetic acid, and ethanol, was matched by both the fermentation and respiration pathways. Notably, acetic acid production was substantially stimulated compared to that of other metabolites during growth at increased temperature. The acetic acid produced in addition to ethanol seemed to subsequently result in adverse effects, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. This, in turn, appeared to cause the specific growth rate, and glucose uptake rate reduced leading to a decrease of the specific ethanol production rate far before glucose depletion. These results suggest that adverse effects from heat, acetic acid, ethanol, and oxidative stressors are synergistic, resulting in a decrease of the specific growth rate and ethanol production rate and, hence, are major determinants of cell stability and ethanol fermentation performance of S. cerevisiae at high temperatures. The results are discussed in the context of possible applications.
Full Text
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00253-014-5691-x
DOI
10.1007/s00253-014-5691-x
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (생화학-분자생물학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
Yonsei Authors
Yang, Kyung Mi(양경미)
URI
https://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/98918
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