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Global Survey of the Roles and Attitudes Toward Social Media Platforms Amongst Urology Trainees

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dc.contributor.author구교철-
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-29T01:19:30Z-
dc.date.available2021-09-29T01:19:30Z-
dc.date.issued2021-01-
dc.identifier.issn0090-4295-
dc.identifier.urihttps://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/184309-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To perform a global survey assessing the role of and the attitudes toward media platforms amongst training Urologists METHODS: We distributed a 21-item online survey on social medial (SoMe) and other media platforms to current Urology trainees by email via individual institutions and multiple Urological associations. The survey acquired data including baseline characteristics, the role of and attitudes toward SoMe and other media platforms in training and assessed the prevalence of Social Media Disorder (SMD) based on the validated 9-item SMD Scale. Stata IC was used for statistical analysis. Results: Three hundred and seventy-two urology trainees in 6 continents participated in the survey. Overall, 99.4% used SoMe and 27.3% listened to healthcare-focused podcasts. Most trainees (85.5%) are using guideline apps for education purposes, with the top 3 most utilized apps being the EAU, AUA, and UpToDate applications. There was mixed sentiment regarding the impact of SoMe on the patient-physician relationship, wherein most felt it challenges the doctor's authority (56.7%) but also empowers the patient (62.7%) and encourages shared-care (57.3%). Unfortunately, 11.3% of urology trainees met criteria for SMD while 65.4% had not reviewed professional guidelines on appropriate SoMe use. Conclusion: Despite practically all urology trainees using SoMe and guideline applications, the majority of trainees have not reviewed or have been educated on professional guidelines for SoMe usage. There is a small but significant number of trainees who are at risk for SMD which may be contributing to higher rates of physician burnout amongst urologists.-
dc.description.statementOfResponsibilityrestriction-
dc.languageEnglish-
dc.publisherElsevier Science-
dc.relation.isPartOfUROLOGY-
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND 2.0 KR-
dc.titleGlobal Survey of the Roles and Attitudes Toward Social Media Platforms Amongst Urology Trainees-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.collegeCollege of Medicine (의과대학)-
dc.contributor.departmentDept. of Urology (비뇨의학교실)-
dc.contributor.googleauthorJustin M Dubin-
dc.contributor.googleauthorAubrey B Greer-
dc.contributor.googleauthorPremal Patel-
dc.contributor.googleauthorDiego M Carrion-
dc.contributor.googleauthorNahuel Paesano-
dc.contributor.googleauthorReda H Kettache-
dc.contributor.googleauthorMalik Haffaf-
dc.contributor.googleauthorSkander Zouari-
dc.contributor.googleauthorDiego Santillan-
dc.contributor.googleauthorZsuzsanna Zotter-
dc.contributor.googleauthorAmanda Chung-
dc.contributor.googleauthorShigeo Horie-
dc.contributor.googleauthorKyo Chul Koo-
dc.contributor.googleauthorJeremy Yc Teoh-
dc.contributor.googleauthorAna Maria Autrán Gómez-
dc.contributor.googleauthorRanjith Ramasamy-
dc.contributor.googleauthorStacy Loeb-
dc.contributor.googleauthorJuan Gomez Rivas-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.urology.2020.09.007-
dc.contributor.localIdA00188-
dc.relation.journalcodeJ02775-
dc.identifier.eissn1527-9995-
dc.identifier.pmid32950594-
dc.identifier.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0090429520311390-
dc.contributor.alternativeNameKoo, Kyo Chul-
dc.contributor.affiliatedAuthor구교철-
dc.citation.volume147-
dc.citation.startPage64-
dc.citation.endPage67-
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationUROLOGY, Vol.147 : 64-67, 2021-01-
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Urology (비뇨의학교실) > 1. Journal Papers

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