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The neural basis of a deficit in abstract thinking in patients with schizophrenia

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.author김재진-
dc.contributor.author박해정-
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-26T16:47:27Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-26T16:47:27Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.issn0925-4927-
dc.identifier.urihttps://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/156820-
dc.description.abstractAbnormal abstract thinking is a major cause of social dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia, but little is known about its neural basis. In this study, we aimed to determine the characteristic abstract thinking-related brain responses in patients using a task reflecting social situations. We conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging while 16 patients with schizophrenia and 16 healthy controls performed a theme-identification task, in which various emotional pictures depicting social situations were presented. Compared with healthy controls, the patients showed significantly decreased activity in the left frontopolar and right orbitofrontal cortices during theme identification. Activity in these two regions correlated well in the controls, but not in patients. Instead, the patients exhibited a close correlation between activity in both sides of the frontopolar cortex, and a positive correlation between the right orbitofrontal cortex activity and degrees of theme identification. Reduced activity in the left frontopolar and right orbitofrontal cortices and the underlying aberrant connectivity may be implicated in the patients' deficits in abstract thinking. These newly identified features of the neural basis of abnormal abstract thinking are important as they have implications for the impaired social behavior of patients with schizophrenia during real-life situations.-
dc.description.statementOfResponsibilityrestriction-
dc.languageEnglish-
dc.publisherElsevier/North-Holland Biomedical Press-
dc.relation.isPartOfPSYCHIATRY RESEARCH-NEUROIMAGING-
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND 2.0 KR-
dc.rightshttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/kr/-
dc.subject.MESHAdult-
dc.subject.MESHBrain/physiopathology*-
dc.subject.MESHBrain Mapping-
dc.subject.MESHEmotions/physiology-
dc.subject.MESHFemale-
dc.subject.MESHHumans-
dc.subject.MESHMagnetic Resonance Imaging/methods-
dc.subject.MESHMale-
dc.subject.MESHNeuropsychological Tests-
dc.subject.MESHSchizophrenia/physiopathology*-
dc.subject.MESHSchizophrenic Psychology*-
dc.subject.MESHSocial Behavior-
dc.subject.MESHThinking/physiology*-
dc.subject.MESHYoung Adult-
dc.titleThe neural basis of a deficit in abstract thinking in patients with schizophrenia-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.collegeCollege of Medicine-
dc.contributor.departmentDept. of Psychiatry-
dc.contributor.googleauthorJooyoung Oh-
dc.contributor.googleauthorJi-Won Chun-
dc.contributor.googleauthorHang Joon Jo-
dc.contributor.googleauthorEunseong Kim-
dc.contributor.googleauthorHae-Jeong Park-
dc.contributor.googleauthorBoreom Lee-
dc.contributor.googleauthorJae-Jin Kim-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pscychresns.2015.08.007-
dc.contributor.localIdA00870-
dc.contributor.localIdA01730-
dc.relation.journalcodeJ02570-
dc.identifier.eissn1872-7123-
dc.identifier.pmid26329118-
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925492715300615-
dc.subject.keywordAbstract thinking-
dc.subject.keywordFMRI-
dc.subject.keywordFrontopolar cortex-
dc.subject.keywordOrbitofrontal cortex-
dc.subject.keywordSchizophrenia-
dc.subject.keywordTheme identification-
dc.contributor.alternativeNameKim, Jae Jin-
dc.contributor.alternativeNamePark, Hae Jeong-
dc.contributor.affiliatedAuthorKim, Jae Jin-
dc.contributor.affiliatedAuthorPark, Hae Jeong-
dc.citation.volume234-
dc.citation.number1-
dc.citation.startPage66-
dc.citation.endPage73-
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationPSYCHIATRY RESEARCH-NEUROIMAGING, Vol.234(1) : 66-73, 2015-
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Psychiatry (정신과학교실) > 1. Journal Papers
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Nuclear Medicine (핵의학교실) > 1. Journal Papers

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