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Outcome of patients with metastatic sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma: results from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.author라선영-
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-04T11:58:42Z-
dc.date.available2016-02-04T11:58:42Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.issn1558-7673-
dc.identifier.urihttps://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/141620-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma is associated with poor prognosis. Data regarding outcome in the targeted therapy era are lacking. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Clinical, prognostic, and treatment parameters in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients with and without sarcomatoid histology treated with targeted therapy were retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS: Two thousand two hundred eighty-six patients were identified (sRCC: n = 230 and non-sRCC: n = 2056). sRCC patients had significantly worse IMDC prognostic criteria compared with non-sRCC (11% vs. 19% favorable risk; 49% vs. 57% intermediate risk, and 40% vs. 24% poor risk; P < .0001). Time from original diagnosis to relapse (excluding synchronous metastatic disease) was shorter in the sRCC group (18.8 vs. 42.9 months; P < .0001). There was no significant difference in the incidence of central nervous system metastases (6%-8%) or underlying clear cell histology (87%-88%). More than 93% of patients received VEGF inhibitors as first-line therapy; objective response was less common in sRCC whereas primary refractory disease was more common (21% vs. 26% and 43% vs. 21%; P < .0001, for both). sRCC patients had significantly less use of second- (P = .018) and third-line (P < .0001) systemic therapy. The median progression-free survival (PFS)/overall survival (OS) was 4.5/10.4 months in sRCC patients and 7.8/22.5 months in non-sRCC patients (P < .0001 for both). Sarcomatoid histology was associated with a significantly worse PFS and OS after adjusting for individual IMDC risk factors in multivariable analysis (hazard ratio, 1.5; P < .0001 for both). CONCLUSION: Patients with sRCC have a shorter time to relapse, worse baseline prognostic criteria, and worse clinical outcome with targeted therapy. Additional insight into the biology of sRCC is needed to develop alternative therapeutics.-
dc.description.statementOfResponsibilityopen-
dc.format.extente79~e85-
dc.relation.isPartOfCLINICAL GENITOURINARY CANCER-
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND 2.0 KR-
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/kr/-
dc.subject.MESHAngiogenesis Inhibitors/therapeutic use*-
dc.subject.MESHAntineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use*-
dc.subject.MESHCarcinoma, Renal Cell/drug therapy*-
dc.subject.MESHCarcinoma, Renal Cell/pathology-
dc.subject.MESHDatabases, Factual-
dc.subject.MESHHumans-
dc.subject.MESHKidney Neoplasms/drug therapy*-
dc.subject.MESHKidney Neoplasms/pathology-
dc.subject.MESHMolecular Targeted Therapy-
dc.subject.MESHNeoplasm Metastasis-
dc.subject.MESHNeoplasm Recurrence, Local/pathology*-
dc.subject.MESHRetrospective Studies-
dc.subject.MESHTreatment Outcome-
dc.subject.MESHVascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/antagonists & inhibitors-
dc.titleOutcome of patients with metastatic sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma: results from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.collegeCollege of Medicine (의과대학)-
dc.contributor.departmentDept. of Internal Medicine (내과학)-
dc.contributor.googleauthorChristos E. Kyriakopoulos-
dc.contributor.googleauthorNamita Chittoria-
dc.contributor.googleauthorToni K. Choueiri-
dc.contributor.googleauthorNils Kroeger-
dc.contributor.googleauthorJae-Lyun Lee-
dc.contributor.googleauthorSandy Srinivas-
dc.contributor.googleauthorJennifer J. Knox-
dc.contributor.googleauthorGeorg A. Bjarnason-
dc.contributor.googleauthorScott D. Ernst-
dc.contributor.googleauthorLori A. Wood-
dc.contributor.googleauthorUlka N. Vaishampayan-
dc.contributor.googleauthorNeeraj Agarwal-
dc.contributor.googleauthorSumanta K. Pal-
dc.contributor.googleauthorRavindran Kanesvaran-
dc.contributor.googleauthorSun-Young Rha-
dc.contributor.googleauthorTakeshi Yuasa-
dc.contributor.googleauthorFrede Donskov-
dc.contributor.googleauthorScott A. North-
dc.contributor.googleauthorDaniel Y. Heng-
dc.contributor.googleauthorBrian I. Rini-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.clgc.2014.08.011-
dc.admin.authorfalse-
dc.admin.mappingfalse-
dc.contributor.localIdA01316-
dc.relation.journalcodeJ00575-
dc.identifier.eissn1938-0682-
dc.identifier.pmid25450036-
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1558767314002043-
dc.subject.keywordIMDC risk model-
dc.subject.keywordKidney cancer-
dc.subject.keywordOverall survival-
dc.subject.keywordPrognostication-
dc.subject.keywordTargeted therapies-
dc.contributor.alternativeNameRha, Sun Young-
dc.contributor.affiliatedAuthorRha, Sun Young-
dc.rights.accessRightsnot free-
dc.citation.volume13-
dc.citation.number2-
dc.citation.startPage79-
dc.citation.endPage85-
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationCLINICAL GENITOURINARY CANCER, Vol.13(2) : 79-85, 2015-
Appears in Collections:
1. College of Medicine (의과대학) > Dept. of Internal Medicine (내과학교실) > 1. Journal Papers

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