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Red blood cell distribution width predicts early mortality in patients with acute dyspnea.

Authors
 Namki Hong ; Jaewon Oh ; Namsik Chung ; Yangsoo Jang ; Sungha Park ; Jong Chan Youn ; Hoyoun Won ; Soo-Young Kim ; Seok-Min Kang 
Citation
 Clinica Chimica Acta, Vol.413(11-12) : 992~997, 2012 
Journal Title
 Clinica Chimica Acta 
ISSN
 0009-8981 
Issue Date
2012
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) has been shown to predict clinical outcomes in cardiovascular diseases. We studied whether RDW is useful to predict early mortality in patients with acute dyspnea at an emergency department (ED). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 907 patients with acute dyspnea who visited the ED from January 2009 to May 2009. Primary outcome was 30-day mortality. RESULTS: Acute decompensated heart failure (29.9%) was the most common adjudicated discharge diagnosis followed by cancer (14.8%) and pneumonia (12.5%). There was a stepwise increase of 30-day mortality risk from lowest (RDW<12.9%) to highest (RDW>14.3%) RDW tertiles (1.4% vs. 8.3% vs. 18.3%; log-rank P<0.001). In multivariate Cox hazard analysis, RDW was an independent predictor of 30-day mortality after adjusting for other risk factors (HR 1.23; 95% CI 1.11-1.36; P<0.001). Adding RDW to conventional clinical predictors significantly improved prediction for 30-day mortality as measured by the area under the ROC curve (AUC, from 0.873 to 0.885; P=0.023) and the net reclassification improvement (NRI=14.1%; P<0.001)/integrated discrimination improvement (IDI=0.038; P=0.006). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that RDW measured at ED is an independent and additive predictor of early mortality in patients with acute dyspnea.
URI
http://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/89980
DOI
10.1016/j.cca.2012.02.024
Appears in Collections:
1. 연구논문 > 1. College of Medicine > Dept. of Internal Medicine
Yonsei Authors
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Link
 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0009898112001064
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