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Clinical analysis of catastrophic epilepsy in infancy and early childhood: Results of the Far-East Asia Catastrophic Epilepsy (FACE) study group

Title
 Clinical analysis of catastrophic epilepsy in infancy and early childhood: Results of the Far-East Asia Catastrophic Epilepsy (FACE) study group
Authors
 Hirokazu Oguni; Taisuke Otsuki; Tai-Tong Wong; Guoming Luan; Hoon-Chul Kang; Heung-Dong Kim; Seung-Chyul Hong; Hiroshi Baba; Koichi Baba; Shinichiro Hamano; Hitoshi Yamamoto; Shigeki Kameyama; Shinichi Hirose; Akio Takahashi; Kenji Sugai; Eiji Watanabe; Yushi Inoue; Katsuhiro Kobayashi
Issue Date
2013
Journal Title
 Brain & Development
ISSN
 0387-7604
Citation
 Brain & Development, Vol.35(8) : 786~792, 2013
Abstract
Purpose: We studied children younger than 6 years old who developed catastrophic epilepsy and were registered in the FACE study group to clarify their clinical characteristics and prevalence of seizure as well as epilepsy types. Subjects: Subjects were prospectively recruited from children with epilepsy who satisfied the following criteria and underwent intensive examination between 2009 and 2012 in 14 collaborative centers: (1) younger than 6 years old and (2) more than 10 seizures/month refractory to all available medical treatments including ACTH therapy, leading to significant psychosocial morbidity. Methods: We analyzed epilepsy onset age, predominant seizure type, etiology, neuropsychological findings, and syndromic classification according to the pre-determined registration format. Results: A total of 314 children were enrolled in this study. Epilepsy onset age in 239 cases (80%) was younger than 12 months. The most frequent seizure type was epileptic spasms (ES), followed by generalized tonic seizures (GTS), which accounted for 42% and 20%, respectively. West syndrome (WS) was the most frequent epileptic syndrome and accounted for 37%, followed by unclassified epilepsy at 21%, neocortical epilepsy at 19%, Lennox–Gastaut syndrome at 12%, Dravet syndrome at 4%, Rasmussen syndrome at 2%, and others. The two most frequent causes of epilepsy were cortical dysplasia and chromosomal anomalies, as shown in 16% and 6%, respectively. However, the etiology of nearly one half of all patients remained unknown. Psychomotor development was already worse than a moderate degree in 62% of subjects at the first examination. Conclusion: The highest proportion of catastrophic epilepsy was WS and its related syndromes featuring ES and GTS, followed by neocortical epilepsy, whose psychomotor development was significantly retarded at examinations.
URI
http://ir.ymlib.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/22282913/88274
DOI
10.1016/j.braindev.2013.02.004
Appears in Collections:
1. 연구논문 > 1. College of Medicine > Dept. of Pediatrics
Yonsei Authors
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Link
 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0387760413001034
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